Archive for the ‘145.330 MHz’ Tag

Amateur Radio This Week: 2017.29   Leave a comment

This has been a good week for amateur radio.  I installed the Yaesu FT-857D in the Crown Vic and I made quite a few contacts driving around Rio Rancho.  Most of my contacts have been DX stations:  Spain, Mexico and Ecuador.  I did work a few stations in the US as well.

Last night, I attended the ARRL Hurricane webinar, which talked about the differnent hurricane nets that run all season (and even into the off-sesaon).  This was a really great presentation, and I was happy that I attended it, even if I missed the first twenty minutes due to no cellular service.

I also checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net a few times from the 2 meter side, though I was unable to get in this morning.

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This Week in Amateur Radio: 2017.19   Leave a comment

My amateur radio activity has been limited over the past week.   Having said that, I did check into the Albuquerque SCAT Net on both the VHF and the UHF side a few times, and I did attend the last Tech Amateur Radio Association (TARA) meeting of the semester.

I will have an active radio week coming up, however, as I will be leaving for storm chasing on Monday.  In this next week, I am getting all of my amateur radio systems tested and ready.  Still on the list is getting the APRS system up and running (TinyTrak3 to an Icom IC-281H), tuning a 20 meter hamstick, and tidying up some of the cords that run around in the Crown Victoria.

I have been slowly updating my DX4Win Logs as well.  They need to be up-to-date so that I can start the storm chase out with a clean voice recorder, and perhaps fewer QSL cards sitting in the pile to return.

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This Week in Amateur Radio: 2017.18   Leave a comment

I updated my logbooks for the first time in two or three weeks.  That was long overdue.  I will update my DX4WIN log soon.

I checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net several times this week.  I also checked into the 432 MHz SSB net on Wednesday, which was my first ever SSB contact on that band.

I also spent some time on Sunday ragchewing on the 145.330 MHz repeater.

Other than that, it has been a slow week for amateur radio, for me anyhow.

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This Week In Amateur Radio: 2017.12   Leave a comment

The biggest accomplishment of this week was getting caught up on my logbooks and DX4Win logs.  Finally.   I had not done so for over a month.  I also sent off a few QSL cards, though I have a long ways to go there before I am caught up.

I made a few HF contacts on the 20 meter county hunter’s net and I also checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net a few times over the past week.  I tried to check into the Caravan Club Net, but I am having all sorts of problems with my VHF/UHF radios.

I have an Alinco DR-605 and an Alinco DR-130TP.  The Alinco DR-605 powers down on transmit, regardless of power output or frequency.  The Alinco DR-130TP transmit audio was cutting out and had a loud hum (the net control reported this to me).  I replaced the microphone on the Alinco DR-130TP to try to fix this problem, but with the new microphone, the rig will not even power.  I am currently mapping out my entire radio system to develop a list of action items to try.  I will post my plan on this blog.

I taught another section of the amateur radio license class.  I basically showed off some useful websites including eham.net, qrz.com, gigaparts.com and arrl.org.  We also set the exam date, time and location.

I also finished the February issue of QST.  I am behind on my reading as well.  I will begin the April issue this week (and skip March for now).  In the February issue, I really appreciated several articles.

First, I really liked the article called, “6 Meter Halo Antenna for DX-ing,” by Jerry Clement, VE6AB.  I really like that this antenna is sturdy enough for mobile use, and I will try building this, once I finish up a few other radio projects.

I also really liked the article titled, “Rebuilding the West Point Cadet Amateur Radio Club – W2KGY” by Matthew SHerburne, KF4WZB.  As someone who has spent time rebuilding the Tech Amateur Radio Assocation at New Mexico Tech on several occasions, it was neat to read another article about rebuilding college clubs.  Also, this student was a former member of the Virginia Tech Amateur Radio Association (VTARA), as was I.

I also love reading articles about DXpeditions, so I appreciated, “Central African DX Adventure,” by Bernie McClenny, W3UR.  Some day, I will go on a DXPedition. I don’t know how or when or where, but I will do so in my lifetime.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
1.  Clement, Jerry.  “6 Meter Halo Antenna for DX-ing.” QST, February 2017, pp. 30-33.

2.  Sherburne, Matthew.  “Rebuilding the West Point Cadet Amateur Radio Club – W2KGY,” QST, February 2017, pp. 79-81.

3.  McClenny, Bernie.  “Central African DX Adventure.”  QST, February 2017, pp. 100-101.

This Week in Amateur Radio: 2017.8   Leave a comment

This has been a busy week for amateur radio.  First, I set up a Yaesu FT-857D in the Malibu for a few days.  I set it up and parked it by the Tech Amateur Radio Association (TARA) club station, and left my keys with those folks so that we could operate during the School Club Roundup contest.  I personally made several contacts (including Hawaii and a special event station in British Columbia) and a few others from the club did as well.

I also made my first contact on the TARA repeater (442.125 MHz), so that was exciting.  I think it is completely configured and in place at this point.

Over the weekend, I repaired my Morse Code key, as it has lost one of the contact screws.  Unbelievably, I found the screw on the floor of my shed amidst the mess, while looking for something else.

I also mounted my Yaesu FT-857D and Yaesu FT-7800 in the Crown Victoria.  I’ve been meaning to do that for ages, but finally got around to it.  I think it’s working out well.  I gave it a good road test and drove to Socorro, making a few contacts along the way.

In terms of operating, I checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net several times.  This morning, I worked Russia, Louisiana and Minnesota on 20 meters from Socorro.

I attempted to check into the Caravan Club Net, but my Alinco DR-605 kept powering down every time I transmitted.  I’ll have to look into this next weekend.

I also updated my log books from the last two weeks of QSOs.  I added quite a few VHF contacts, and a handful of 20 meter HF contacts to the books.

Due to a scheduling conflict, I did not teach the amateur radio license course this week.

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This Week in Amateur Radio: 2017.3   Leave a comment

This week, I have been quite active on 2 meters, checking into the Caravan Club Net, the Rusty Raider’s Net and the Albuquerque SCAT Net often.

On Monday, I commuted to Socorro, NM.  Along the route, I operated from Bernalillo, Valencia and Socorro counties on the 20 meter county hunter’s net.  In Socorro, the electrical noise was awful, and I ended up terminating the run early.

We listened to Amateur Radio Newsline on Sunday night as well.

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Amateur Radio This Week: 2017.2   Leave a comment

This week in amateur radio, I checked into several local VHF nets here in New Mexico.  On Sunday night, I checked into the Caravan Club Net, and then today, I checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net and then the Rusty Raider’s Net.

I also spent some time listening on 10 meters, as two stations were ragchewing, and I could copy them.  They were, however, the only stations I could hear on the band.

I also read the January, 2017, issue of QST.  I always get mixed feelings when I read the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) issue.  On one hand, I am always inspired by all the neat projects, and I want to work on all of them…but on the other hand, most of them are well above my skill level.  Case in point- I have a vertical antenna in my yard that doesn’t work very well, and I haven’t fixed it.

I did order a transmission hump mount for the Crown Victoria.  I’ll see how that works out.  I need a better system than wedging radios between the seat and the transmission tunnel, and this is worth a shot.

I also received a QSL envelope from the ARRL QSL Bureau.  Mostly, it contained QSL cards from the W1AW/# event in 2014, but there were a few Japanese and Canadian cards in there as well.

Thank you for reading my post.