Archive for the ‘ARRL’ Tag

Amateur Radio This Week: 2017.28   Leave a comment

I received my Yaesu FT-857D back from repair.  I have plugged it into my home antenna station, and there is still a ton of noise.  However, I am having all sorts of base antenna problems, so that is not really an indication of a problem.  The real test will be when I plug it into my car.  Right now, the borrowed 857 is running S7 to S8 noise, with no filters.  If mine is still running S9+20dB, with or without filters, I’m going to send it back.

Other than that, I’ve been working through my stack of QSL cards.  I have quite a few still to go.  I did log all of my W1AW QSL cards from 2014, back when they did a number of special event stations to commemorate 100 years of the American Radio Relay League (ARRL).  I wish I had participated in this event a little more, as I was missing quite a few states.  However, I was having problems with my 857 back then as well.

This week, I’ll test the 857, return a few direct DX cards, send a few more DX enveloped to the bureau, and return the rest of the SASE’D QSL/MRCs that are sitting on my desk.

I have my work cut out for me!

Thank you for reading my post.

 

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Amateur Radio This Week: 2017.26   Leave a comment

This has been a busy week for amateur radio. I finally updated my logbook from our grand adventure to the east coast. I haven’t totaled up the number of contacts or new counties yet, but just know that it was a lot. I have updated my counties graphic.

I have operated from enough counties that I have given out the last county in the state for one operator or another 25 times. In fact, MARAC sent me this nifty plaque commemorating the occasion:
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This weekend was also ARRL’s Field Day. I participated with several other ham radio operators from the Datil Wells Campground, using the call NM5FD. I added 160 SSB QSOs on 20 meters during my shift. I had quite a pileup going, and had a great time working them all. Here is a view of the sky through the antenna:

Thank you for reading my post.

This Week in Amateur Radio: 2017.7   Leave a comment

This week has been exciting.

On Friday, the Second Vice President of the ARRL, the NM Section Manager, and representatives of Rocky Mountain Ham Radio attended the Tech Amateur Radio Association club meeting to present to us a UHF repeater.  Rocky Mountain Ham Radio donated the repeater to us, and we had it up and running by the end of the meeting, in a temporary configuration.  Final arrangements will be announced as we finish building this system.  More information can be found here:  http://www.rmham.org/wordpress/rmhr-donates-repeater-to-tara

Thank you!

I checked into a number of 2 meter nets over the past week.  I made my usual rounds to the Caravan Club Net, the Rusty Raider’s Net, and the Albuquerque SCAT Net.  I also tuned around 10 meters and called CQ, but made no contacts.

This week is School Club Roundup.  We don’t have a good antenna at New Mexico Tech, but I think we are going to try magnet mounting and Hustler resonator on the metal roof.  I brought down resonators for 20 meters, 40 meters and 80 meters, as well as a mast.

This week’s amateur radio licensure course went through waves, antennas, and propagation.  I think the students were understanding what I was saying, as they asked high-level, intelligent questions.

Thank you for reading my post.

Amateur Radio This Week: 2017.2   Leave a comment

This week in amateur radio, I checked into several local VHF nets here in New Mexico.  On Sunday night, I checked into the Caravan Club Net, and then today, I checked into the Albuquerque SCAT Net and then the Rusty Raider’s Net.

I also spent some time listening on 10 meters, as two stations were ragchewing, and I could copy them.  They were, however, the only stations I could hear on the band.

I also read the January, 2017, issue of QST.  I always get mixed feelings when I read the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) issue.  On one hand, I am always inspired by all the neat projects, and I want to work on all of them…but on the other hand, most of them are well above my skill level.  Case in point- I have a vertical antenna in my yard that doesn’t work very well, and I haven’t fixed it.

I did order a transmission hump mount for the Crown Victoria.  I’ll see how that works out.  I need a better system than wedging radios between the seat and the transmission tunnel, and this is worth a shot.

I also received a QSL envelope from the ARRL QSL Bureau.  Mostly, it contained QSL cards from the W1AW/# event in 2014, but there were a few Japanese and Canadian cards in there as well.

Thank you for reading my post.

 

Amateur Radio This Week: #47   Leave a comment

I’m sorry, I’ve been avoiding you guys because I haven’t done any amateur radio activities for several weeks.

However, this weekend, I was able to operate for a little while in the ARRL SSB Sweepstakes contest.  I operated as W5MPZ with a team of folks around New Mexico at the ARRL NM Regional Manager’s house.

This weekend, I really need to catch up on my logbooks.  I will

1.  Log all contacts from my phone

2.  Send 5 QSL cards

Thank you for reading my post.

Posted November 22, 2016 by n3mra in Contesting, Special Event Station

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Daily Radio Report: 11/22/15   Leave a comment

Yesterday, I played in the ARRL SSB Sweepstakes contest. I only made 34 contacts in the contest, plus one contact that was not in the contest. I did, however, pick out a great location to contest for the last few hours:

Laguna Beach, CA, made a great place to end the contest!

I was able to get my ten band antenna to tune up on 10-40 meters, and made contacts on 20 meters and 40 meters.

Thank you for reading my post.

ARRL TI-2: Day 5   Leave a comment

Yesterday was the final day of the ARRL Teacher’s Institute. I couldn’t believe how quickly the week came and went.

We spent the morning wrapping up a few of the topics we had covered throughout the week, as well as set up for another pass of FunCube. This pass was much lower on the horizon, so we did not collect as much data this time around.

Lunch was a little longer, so that we would have the opportunity to expand upon some of the ideas we had throughout the week. We were to present a brief lesson plan using some of the information we had learned. I had an idea for measuring the radiation from different soil types, so I talked about that.

After lunch, we gave feedback and filed paperwork and packed up to leave.

This was a great workshop, and I highly recommend it for any teachers who are trying to bring radio and electronics into the classroom.

Thank you for reading my post!